History Cool Kids: Aprende historia en Instagram

En su cuenta de Instagram Dain Lee nos muestra el lado B de la historia que no nos enseñaron en los libros de texto.

Desde bailarines exóticas, Bob Ross, inventos extraños, pájaros gigantes hasta datos tan interesantes que te mantendrán en continuo scroll por todo feed. El es Dain Lee y tiene una cuenta en Instagram sobre curiosidades de la historia con más de 540,000 seguidores.

Aunque actualmente trabaja en marketing digital, Lee nunca perdió el gusto por la historia que le inculcó su padre. En su cuenta normalmente muestra las historias de sectores marginados o minorías, pues son los relatos que pocas veces escuchamos en la historia oficial:

“El fin no es solo entretener, sino enseñar a la gente sobre personas e historias que nunca nos fueron desveladas en las clases mientras crecíamos (…) Es muy difícil contar la historia de forma completa y precisa, ya que nos llega de personas con sesgos y perspectivas. En gran parte, los vencedores moldean la narrativa, sin embargo, eso no significa que la narración de los perdedores esté completamente extraviada.”

Aquí algunas de nuestras historias favoritas que relata sobre temas tan diversos como cine, música, entretenimiento, política o deportes:

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A group of friends pose by a memorial of the 1692 Salem witch trials, 1945.⁣ ⁣ In 1976, Linnda R. Caporael, a professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, wrote a paper called "Ergotism: The Satan Loosed In Salem", which proposed the theory that a fungus in bad bread caused the symptoms of "witchcraft" which drove the townspeople of Salem to persecute one another.⁣ ⁣ Ergot is the name of the fungus, and it grows on rye and related plants. When ingested by humans it can cause a variety of symptoms such as convulsions, choking, hallucinations or gangrene (causing the limbs to fall off). If one were to stop eating the tainted bread early enough, they may be able to recover. This explains why some people who were suffering from "demonic possessions" and sought refuge in churches and stopped eating low-grade rye bread were miraculously healed. Members of the clergy were able to afford higher-quality bread and thus didn't suffer from the poisoning as often as the commoners. ⁣ Ergot poisoning was quite common during the Middle Ages and killed a lot of people in Europe in quite horrific ways. There is a strong correlation between wet summers (ideal conditions for ergot growth) and reports of witchcraft. In Norway and Scotland, records of witch persecution were only found in areas where rye was grown and used to make bread.⁣ ⁣ #salem⁣ #ryebread ⁣ #witchcraft

Una publicación compartida de History Cool Kids ® (@historycoolkids) el

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The charred remains of Soviet cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov who became the first person to die from a space mission when his space capsule crashed after re-entry because of a parachute malfunction in 1967. Komarov knew the spaceship was not safe to fly but everyone was terrified of Leonid Brezhnev, leader of the Soviet Union at that time, who wanted to show the world a spectacular display from the space program in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Soviet Union. No one wanted to challenge Brezhnev in either delaying or scrapping the mission altogether. Before his mission, Komarov confided in friends that he was probably going to die. Nevertheless, he refused to step down because his replacement would have been his best friend, Yuri Gagarin. The two were very close and would go hunting together (swipe left) whenever they had free time. Gagarin wrote a 10-page memo asking to delay the mission, however, no one dared to send it up the chain of command. Others suggested to Komarov that he simply refuse to fly, but he just replied: "If I don’t make this flight, they’ll send the backup pilot instead. That’s Yura…and he’ll die instead of me. We’ve got to take care of him.” Gagarin showed up on launch day and tried to convince Komarov and crew members to let him pilot the spacecraft instead, but he was turned away. Before going on the mission, Komarov demanded an open casket funeral. He wanted his superiors to see what they had done to him.

Una publicación compartida de History Cool Kids ® (@historycoolkids) el

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